Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is facing even more rebellion as a rural mayor and a Michigan sheriff have joined with the state’s legislature and citizens angry over the executive’s overreaching emergency orders.

Perry Mayor James Huguelet let residents of the small town northeast of Lansing know he was on their side Monday with a single order.

“It is past time that the government leadership treat the people of Michigan and of Perry like the responsible, thoughtful adults they are,” a copy of the mayor’s administrative order posted to Perry’s Facebook page read.

“I write today to state clearly my opposition to some of Governor Whitmer’s executive orders,” he wrote.

According to Huguelet, several of the governor’s orders are arguably overstepping the authority afforded her office.

To counter the rising authoritarianism, the mayor simply pulled his town from enforcing the governor’s order altogether.

“Therefore,” Huguelet wrote, “we will continue not having strict enforcement of these orders and effective immediately the City of Perry will not assist other law enforcement agencies in the strict enforcement of these orders.”

Thankfully, the little town is not alone in the struggle against the governor.

Shiawassee County Michigan Sheriff Brian BeGole, who patrols the county that Perry calls home, issued a statement on the very same day making it clear what his office’s stance is on the controversy.

“Through this period of uncertainty,” BeGole wrote in a letter posted to his department’s Facebook page, “I continue to remind myself that we derive our authority from the consent of the governed, the great people of Michigan.”

“I have decided,” the sheriff said, “within my authority, that our office cannot and will not divert our primary resources and efforts towards enforcement of the Governor Whitmer’s executive orders.”

With a rising number of interactions from supportive citizens, it appears these officials’ actions are very popular.

This isn’t Whitmer’s only problem, either.

The backlash to her authoritative orders was strong. Armed protesters made a very public appearance at the Michigan House of Representatives at the state Capitol after making their way into the building.

Republicans in the state legislature flexed their own muscle as well, moving to hold Whitmer accountable for her response to the current crisis.

The state Senate leader even came forward and slammed the governor for being “drunk” on power.

Resistance against Whitmer’s excessive authority continues to grow, a problem that could soon face even more governors obsessed with ruling by executive order.